All posts tagged: humility

Is the Writing on the Wall for You?

-written by Betsie Richards Around this time last year, I was faced with a huge decision. It was a decision I prayed over very intently, honestly more than I’ve ever prayed over a decision before. I can’t even count all the ways God graciously showed me the answer. Signs, if you chose to think of them that way, sermons, bible study lessons, and random unsolicited messages from family and friends all confirmed what my decision should be. At one point, I’m pretty sure I said outloud, “Ok Jesus, I get it. I see what you’re trying to tell me.” I felt like I could clearly see what I needed to do as if it had been written out for me personally. We’ve all probably heard the phrase “the writing’s on the wall.” Sometimes in regards to failing businesses, failing managers for sports teams, and, sadly, sometimes even failed relationships or marriages. Unfortunately, most times the phrase carries negative implications. Daniel 5 seems to be no exception. King Belshazzar has a moment where he physically sees …

What Would You Include In Your Autobiography?

Who doesn’t love a good story? Especially if the story is about you. Back when people read newspapers, it was exciting to have your story printed so others could read it. We love to share about the good in our lives and I think this is why so many famous people write their own autobiographies. The beauty of story-telling is you get to include or leave out whatever details you want. If I was having you write about my life, I’d start with all the good stuff, too. Very rarely do you read a story of someone’s life where they admit how wrong they were, how they screwed it up, or the stupid mistakes they made. We may include bad things that happened to us, but rarely sinful decisions we made ourselves. In Daniel 4, King Nebuchadnezzar was the ruler of the entire world. He had built an incredible kingdom as he looked over it, he said, “Look at this great city of Babylon! By my own mighty power, I have built this beautiful city …

3 Helpful Questions To Improve Your Workday

Of the 31,102 verses found in the Bible, which verse comes to your mind more than any other? For some people, it might be John 3:16 as a reminder that God loves us and has a plan. For others, it might be Psalm 23 as they look to God as their shepherd and provider. Or maybe it’s Philippians 4:13 as you lean into God as your strength. For me, Colossians 3:23 seems to be a constant reminder that I live and work for God: Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people. This verse impacts not only my workweek but also reminds me to offer the little daily tasks up to the Lord. A similar is found in 2 Timothy 2:15-16 where Paul writes Work hard so you can present yourself to God and receive his approval. Be a good worker, one who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly explains the word of truth. Avoid worthless, foolish talk that only leads to more godless …

The Effect of Serving with the Heart of Jesus

-written by Matthew Hicks When I think of the word serve, many different things come to my mind: serving in the military, serving dinner, serving a ping pong ball, serving the church. While all different, in each instance action is required from something or someone. I can’t serve in the military without first signing paperwork committing to service. I can’t serve dinner without first getting off the couch and preparing the meal. I can’t serve a ping pong ball without first finding an opponent and gathering the necessary equipment.  For me, I couldn’t serve at SoHills without first practicing and waking up early on Sunday morning. Do you notice a pattern? Each form of service is an effect of the initial action.  The end result, the service we are trying to achieve, is the effect and our actions are the cause.  We live in a cause & effect world; everything we do has an impact on our life and the lives of those around us. Jesus was fully aware of this cause & effect world …

Your Sin Problem is a Pride Problem

Vine’s Expository Dictionary defines humble as “low-lying” and humility as “lowliness of mind.” When scriptures speak of humility, they are referring to one who not only acts as a servant, but also thinks like a servant. Some mainstream schools of psychology argue that a majority of our problems come about because we have poor self-esteem. In other words, we think too lowly of ourselves, and as a result we have trouble communicating or even completing necessary tasks. But scripture says, “Pride goes before destruction, and haughtiness before a fall. Better to live humbly with the poor than to share plunder with the proud. Those who listen to instruction will prosper; those who trust the Lord will be joyful” (Proverbs 16:18-20). I am going to disagree with psychology and side with the scriptures: a majority of our sin comes about because we view ourselves too highly. Many of our actions, desires, and words are self-exalting. Take gluttony for example. The over eating of food is only concerned about self-pleasure. Maybe the food comforts the person. Perhaps he just loves the taste and can’t …

This Week For Sunday

 Blessed are those who are humble. They will be given the earth. –Matthew 5:5, NIRV I was recently with a small group of children’s ministers from all over the country. In conversation the verse Numbers 12:3 was mentioned, which says, “Now Moses was very humble—more humble than any other person on earth.” Someone pointed out the humorous fact that Moses is the author of this verse. It does seem prideful for someone to claim he is humble, and even more so the most humble man that has ever lived. But consider Moses’ response to God’s call for his life.  Moses understood the weight of being God’s representative before the Pharaoh and pleaded with God to call someone else. He fell on his face and stuttered, “W-w-w-who am I to appear b-b-b-before Ph-f-f-araoh? W-w-w-who am I to lead the p-p-p-people of Israel out of Egypt-t-t?” (Exodus 3:11) Paul writes, “‘Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners’—and I am the worst of them all” (1 Timothy 1:15). Moses raises his hand in agreement, “I’m right there with you, Paul.”  These Biblical pillars …

4 Simple Challenges Direct From Philippians 2

Have you ever opened up the Bible, began reading and felt completely lost? The Bible is full of historical events, unusual commands, and lists of names that can intimidate the reader. While some books in the Bible might confuse the reader, Philippians has only four chapters and is full of encouraging wisdom. Here are 4 simple challenges direct from Philippians 2 that Paul challenges the church to become. 1. Don’t be selfish; don’t try to impress others (vs 3).  If applied, these eight words could change every school, home, and workplace in America. How many times do we get ourselves in trouble by putting our wants before the needs of others? How often do we find ourselves caught up in lies because we are trying to impress others? With these words, Paul challenges the church to have the same attitude of Christ. 2. Be humble, thinking of others as better than yourselves (vs 3).  If you step back and look at the consequence for sin, you will see that pride destroys. Pride says, “I deserve this” and …

Justified and Humbled

Justification.  There’s a big church word for ya.  At some point in my Christian education, and probably several times over, justification was explained to me as “God sees me ‘just-as-if-I’d’ never sinned.”  I fully anticipated Dale using that exact phrase this past Sunday. Instead, first service he said, “Justification is not a synonym for amnesty… God is not just saying, ‘It’s alright, we’ll just forget all that this time. We’re good. We’ll just forget about it.  No.  He can’t do that.” God is keenly aware of my sin, even more so than myself. He knows the evil desires that wage war within me (James 4:1). Because of His great love for me, He was willing to go to great lengths to make me, the unrighteous, righteous.  Because of Christ’s sacrifice on the cross, I am declared righteous; I am justified.   I didn’t have to walk across hot coals or participate in a yearly pilgrimage.  I didn’t have to beat my body into submission or complete some spiritual check-list. Even so, none of these things would have been enough.  There was …